Tuesday, April 20, 2010

What are these 2 Atlanta plants?

A vine with yellow and red flowers, and plant with thorny leaves, blue berries, and a few bright red leaves.


These two survive on a steep Georgia hillside next to my house. English Ivy, Poison Ivy, and Kudzu share the space. In the spring they surprise us.

The vine is a doll.
P1010757-2010-04-20-Reeder-Mystery-Vine-Flower-Red-Yellows

P1010759-2010-04-20-Reeder-Mystery-Vine-Flower-Red-Yellows

The bush is just weird. It has thorny leaves and blue berries.
P1010760-2010-04-20-Reeder-Mystery-Plan-ThornLeaf-Blue-Berry-Red-Leaf

But it's these red leaves that catch the eye.
P1010760-2010-04-20-Reeder-Mystery-Plan-ThornLeaf-Blue-Berry-Red-Leaf-2

They grow on this bank. I doubt anyone planted them.
PC061459-2008-East-Face-From-SE

Thanks for your help.
Terry

10 comments:

  1. Terry, those are interesting! I have no clue, but thanks for the images, very pretty, someone will know.

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  2. The vine is crossvine. The bush is mahonia. They are both natives. I love them both!

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  3. Cyndia rocks vines and bushes. Thanks so much.

    Here is Crossvine. I need to identify it from the leaves so I don't cut it back.

    Here is Mahonia. I don't know if this is the right kind.

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  4. Terry I adore the crossvine, how beautiful!!

    Karena
    Art by Karena

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  5. Crossvine is gorgeous! And love that it's native!!

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  6. Aha David Wm Turner say the common name for the mahonia is "Oregon Grape bush" or "Oregon Grape Holly" http://tinyurl.com/2bhdev8

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  7. Those are both beautiful flowers. You should get clippings, root them and plant them in your garden.

    Thanks for the picture suggestions. I really like the idea of rotating a few of my favorites. -cristi

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  8. I know this is way after the fact, but as you can see from Terry's link, the Mahonia is considered invasive -- and rightly so. It pops up everywhere in the woods around Atlanta, due to the apparent delectability of its berries to birds. There is a type of Mahonia that is native to the American Northwest, but that's not the kind that is so pervasive around here -- that one comes from China.

    So although it's a pretty plant, you may want to consider replacing it with something native -- if you care about that kind of thing.

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