Saturday, August 31, 2013

Cutting the Crum: Partial Demolition of the Crum and Forster Building (1928) is underway

I don't know how long this will take so you'd better get over there. See the map below.

UPDATE: They will begin demolition with the big machines Sunday at 10am, September 1, 2013.

There is plenty of  "story" behind all this. The short of is here: "Advocacy Was Successful But Recourse Has Sealed the Fate Crum & Forster" documentation from the Atlanta Preservation about efforts to save the building intact.

They've almost completed the cuts.

This the south side, the service side of the building, west to the left, east to the right. The left part stays.

The front door faces west, fronts Spring Street. They'll save this part.

They are salvaging the roof tile.

I presume this is Ludowici roof tile but probably not made in Ludowici, Georgia. Maybe they'll use it in a new building on this property.

While it was abandoned, they put up these fake widows. It helped keep squatters out, reduced the fire risk. From a distance it was a good look. Up close it seemed an odd optical illusion.

The interiors might have been impressive in 1928.

They are removing soffit and fascia. You don't realize how important it is to the design until it's gone. Flemish bond brick work faces the street.

How they built it. Looks like bird nest territory.

They've got some big saws. The right stays, the left goes.

They are protecting the right side, the part they are saving. They'll saw through everything inside and out.

They've completed this cut as of today.

Go see, you should always go the wake.

View Larger Map

Make sure to see the front door.


  1. Torn on this (pun intended). Obviously losing the full architectural intention isn't ideal, but it'll be nice to have this block join the rest of Tech Square's vibrancy. I'll leave final judgement until the new building's complete.

  2. It could have become quite vibrant as the free-standing building it was, if Georgia Tech had actually done something with it. The architecture of the building is not what wasn't vibrant. It was the imagination of the Georgia Tech Foundation that lacked vibrancy.

  3. Terry, thank you for posting these photos.


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