Saturday, January 9, 2010

Teardown adds windows, siding, curves

I'm participating in Metamorphosis Monday at Between Naps on the Porch. Thought you might like an update on the teardown across the street. There is a slide show at the bottom with the whole sequence so far.

Every detail makes a difference.
If it was a dog, we'd say it was growing into her feet. Remember?
P9100865-AxlR-NorthFacade-From-Street
PA010970-1261-NW-September-30-2009

Every day brings a new look. Here is the eyebrow dormer:
P1000059-2009-12-28-1261-Eyebrow-Dormer

You can't tell from this one picture but the eyebrow curve will be picked up everywhere. It looks forlorn with no windows.
P1000058-2009-12-28-1261-Eyebrow-Dormer-Full-NW

The windows and siding are going up: shingles and Hardiplank. The windows will be dark, the planks and shingles are pre-finished but not in the final color. There will be a lot of stone too.
P1000111-2010-01-01-1261-Shingles-Lapsiding

Here is the recessed side door, pleasantly sheltered by a paneled bump-out.
P1000156-2010-01-08-1261-East-Side-Door-Panelin-Brackets

What is inside the bumpout? A sunny room I'm sure.
P1000156-2010-01-08-1261-East-Side-Door-Panelin-Brackets-Detail

Check the curves: eyebrow, gable window, segmental arch for the porch. There is more to come: curved roof over the front door and curved transom.
P1000159-2010-01-08-1261-NW-Corner-Arch-Eyebrow

It's not fair to call this a teardown anymore. This is becoming a seriously good house.

Thanks,
Terry

P.S. Here is the whole sequence so far:


TK


Thanks to Metamorphosis Monday at Between Naps on the Porch.

15 comments:

  1. Just my silly observation - but I like the way the back portion of the house "sticks out" a little (especially on the right) and looks like the older homes in the neighborhood. Making it look like the front was an addition to the home. (kinda like the old home was saved and added to - even though it was actually demolished - they should have used old bricks to build the chimney).
    Keep us updated!
    -Trish

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  2. Trish, I like the rambling, bumped out, added-on, not new look. (I like a lot of other looks too.)

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  3. I am so enjoying following this with you Terry. Can't wait to see what's inside, too!

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  4. I completely agree with Trish on that chimney...hardiplank covered chimnies are a cop out...fire and smoke shouldn't come out out something seemingly covered in wood! Nevertheless, this is turning out to be a really good looking house. Eyebrow dormer is a nice touch. Can't wait to see more.

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  5. Too often that type of house has zero curves. Not one.

    How rich. An eyebrow dormer & MORE !!

    Are you having fun traipsing thru the inside too?

    Garden & Be Well, XO Tara

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  6. I'm not going inside. As much as I'd like to, it's so personal to go into someones private house uninvited. I'd feel a bit different if it was a spec house. Maybe I'll get a tour some day.

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  7. You should contact the architect or builder - I am sure they would give you a tour if it means publicity for them!

    I detest eyebrow dormers - not sure why! I am sure everyone has their own things they like and dislike, that's what makes the world go round.

    Interesting comments about how brick would have been a better choice for the chimney. I like to read comments that make me see something in a new way.

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  8. There are 2 chimneys. We'll see how they turn out in the composition, pretty good I suspect. They might plant one tree that will distract the eye.

    You can imagine the budget discussion: Hardi-plank done in a few hours verses brick or stone with the foundation/framing to support it, scaffolding, skilled and unskilled labor. Could buy lots of furniture or a make bunch of car payments for that kind of money.

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  9. Love eyebrow curves. This looks like it's shaping up to be a very tasteful new home.

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  10. terry,

    Let's get a compass to check out which direction that sunny window is facing. Better yet lets look at where MOST of the windows are facing. If you want to build a home to take advantage of the seasons the indiscriminate placement of windows should be avoided. A simple guideline: 60% of the windows face South, 30% east/west and 10% north. Take a trip over to Southface to see what I'm talking about. Your Eco-Inpsector

    Dan Curl

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  11. I love the little eyebrow window! It is coming along nicely!

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  12. The Eyebrow is on the north side. The south side has killer windows and shading overhangs for the hot Atlanta summer sun. Lot's of trees on the south side too.

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  13. I believe that this house turned out to be really beautiful. It is very well-proportioned, and the color cools your eyes. As for my new home, it turned out to be really beautiful and instead of ordinary siding, we used vinyl siding. Boston homes are truly beautiful and majestic to look at.

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