Sunday, February 12, 2017

They Tore It Down the Next Day

I'll be dog if they didn't tear it down the very next day. It was at 2348 Hosea Williams where Second Avenue crosses Hosea - a forlorn corner that's coming back.


I've been passing here for more than 15 years but something struck me on February 2nd. I drove two blocks past it and thought: "Better go back and take a picture."

Dekalb County property tax records say it was built in 1910. I'll take you around the house counterclockwise. My full size pictures are in Flickr if you want to see more detail: 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915 East Lake at 2nd Ave Dekalb tax records say 1910

20170202_114018 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915
It was so beat up inside.

20170202_114147 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_114139 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_113819 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_113837 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_113858 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_113907 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_113918 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_114001 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_114035 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_114055 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_114106 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_114113 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915

20170202_114211 2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915


Here's where it is.




2348 Hosea Williams Kirkwood Teardown probably 1900-1915 plat
Parcel ID: 15 204 06 046, Deeded Acreage  0.5

Here's what the corner looked like on 2017-02-12




Sunday, January 22, 2017

"People Are People's Greatest Joy" - Terry's Tiny Book Review

This slide "got" me, led me to a 1980 book and to a mesmerizing video about human nature.




It just so happens that my two favorite presentations in the last decate were about "placemaking" the first by Fred Kent from Project for Public Spaces the second by Mathew Lister from Gehl Architects (above).

Turns out both were inspired by this book: The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces - William H. Whyte. Remember William Whyte? If you are my age you probably read his "The Organization Man."



"What attracts people most, it would appear, is other people. If I belabor the point, it is because many urban spaces are ... designed as if the opposite were true..."  William H. Whyte.

Fortunately there's a video produced for Public Broadcasting.

You will enjoy watching.


The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces: William H. Whyte from Nelly Oli on Vimeo.


Thanks to Atlanta City Studio, to Tim, Jody, Ryan, Kevin, Vanessa, Heather, CNU Atlanta and ...

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