Friday, August 1, 2014

Gordon's Column, Remembering Gordon, Cherishing our Gordons.

I watched as the chief mason looked over his shoulder tilting the brick, looking back at Gordon for the proper angle knowing he was building something special. This glorious column and fencing made the little porch into a welcoming outdoor room.

Most of Gordon's clients have things like this. It could be a piece of furniture, a painting, bowl, color, fabric, or nicknack, something we couldn't imagine working. We call them "Gordons" and we smile. Why did we ever doubt him?

When I'm in Decatur, I drive this great little street to see this little 1925 house, to remember Gordon Stringer via this column and that moment with the mason.

 
Gordon designed this renovation, designed everything inside and out. He punctuated it with two "crazy" columns.

IMG_9398 2014-07-28 Gordon Stringer Column fruit brick mason Ponce Place Decatur
Gordon gave me a tour when it was all studs, walls moved, ceilings raised, skylights in, bathrooms laid out, kitchen roughed out.

Inside were the lanterns, the curvy metal fencing, the fruity urns and plinths, a drawing of the shutters, color samples of everything. These were the details. You can see that Gordon pulled the color of the fruity urns into the window and door frames.

IMG_9396 2014-07-28 Gordon Stringer Column fruit brick mason Ponce Place Decatur detail
Gordon shopped Scott Antique Market among other places. He'd find things that fit his vision, knowing he could make it work. I don't know if the purchases came from the vision or the vision from the purchases. Probably both.

If you could keep up with him, shopping with Gordon was big fun.

IMG_9396 2014-07-28 Gordon Stringer Column fruit brick mason Ponce Place Decatur detail
I was there the day the masons built the columns. Gordon directed every brick course by eye.

The chief mason knew he was building something unique and special, building a Gordon.

Every time I drive by I smile.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Terry's Tiny Tour: Brad Heppner's Extraordinary Design in Morningside / Lenox Park

This house moved me. It's for sale but it's expensive. It's a sculpture with breathtaking yet comfortable public spaces and with cozy, quiet private spaces. French Normandy? Glen Mercutt? Edwin Lutyens? Charles Voysey? Zen? Yes?



Brad said they studied the rhythm and scale of the street, developed the twin gables, started with a cube in the front and a cube in the back, connected the cubes with a "service" area, then began sculpting, creating axes and enfilades, removing the unnecessary.

Brad makes it sound easy and routine doesn't he?

IMG_9194 2014-07-23 Berkshire Modern Brad Heppner
All four sides of the house are interesting.

I met architect Brad Heppner by blogging this house in 2009: "White and Pointy - 80 Years Apart." That blog led to three visits to this house including yesterday when Brad spoke about it.

IMG_9231 2014-07-23 Berkshire Modern Brad Heppner speaking
Brad spoke to agents and brokers yesterday. That's Brad standing on the right with jacket.

I looked at the ad copy and pictures. I can't do much better.

Let me give you two tiny video tours of the private spaces. I like them so much.

The master suite included a modest bedchamber. The cove ceiling makes it uncannily quiet. I start in the public space. If you can't see the master suite video below, please click here.


Extraordinary. If you can't see the master suite video above, please click here.

The children's and guest bedrooms are upstairs surrounding a daylight lounge and study space. If you can't see the child/guest bedroom suite video below, please click here.

Extraordinary. If you can't see the child/guest bedroom suite video above, please click here.

Thanks to Brad and to Bob Glascock for inviting me.

P.S.
B-shre-Pre-Teardown-Heppner Berkshire teardown before
Before.

IMG_9233 2014-07-23 Berkshire Modern Brad Heppner
After.